POLICE: A FIELD GUIDE

Publisher: Verso (March 13, 2018)

 

ISBN-10: 1786630141
ISBN-13: 978-1786630148

A Field Guide to the Police is a study of the indirect and taken-for granted language of policing, a language we're all forced to speak when we talk about law enforcement. The book refuses to see the world as police do, instead it contends that when we talk about police and police reform, we speak the language of police legitimation through the art of euphemism. State sexual assault becomes "body-cavity search," and ruthless beatings become "plain compliance."  Like any other field guide, it reveals a world that is hidden in plain view. In entries like "Police dog," "Stop and frisk," "Rough ride," and scores more, the authors show how "copspeak" obscures the true meaning and history of policing. This book will arm activists on the streets--as well as anyone with an open mind--on one of the key issues of our time: police violence. The book argues that a redefined language of policing might help us chart a future free of police and police violence.

PROPERTIES OF VIOLENCE

Publisher: University of Georgia Press; First Edition (March 1, 2013)

ISBN-10: 0820345024
ISBN-13: 978-0820345024

Through a compelling story about the conflict over a notorious Mexican-period land grant in northern New Mexico, David Correia examines how law and property are constituted through violence and social struggle. Spain and Mexico populated what is today New Mexico through large common property land grants to sheepherders and agriculturalists. After the U.S.-Mexican War the area saw rampant land speculation and dubious property adjudication. Nearly all of the huge land grants scattered throughout New Mexico were rejected by U.S. courts or acquired by land speculators. Of all the land grant conflicts in New Mexico's history, the struggle for the Tierra Amarilla land grant, the focus of Correia's story, is one of the most sensational, with numerous nineteenth-century speculators ranking among the state's political and economic elite and a remarkable pattern of resistance to land loss by heirs in the twentieth century.

Correia narrates a long and largely unknown history of property conflict in Tierra Amarilla characterized by nearly constant violence―night riding and fence cutting, pitched gun battles, and tanks rumbling along the rutted dirt roads of northern New Mexico. The legal geography he constructs is one that includes a surprising and remarkable cast of characters: millionaire sheep barons, Spanish anarchists, hooded Klansmen, Puerto Rican terrorists, and undercover FBI agents. By placing property and law at the center of his study, Properties of Violence provocatively suggests that violence is not the opposite of property but rather is essential to its operation.

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